Discovering the Preferences of Physicians with Regards to Rank-ordered Medical Documents

O'Sullivan, D., Wilk, S., Michalowski, W., Slowinski, R., Thomas, R. & Farion, K. (2012). Discovering the Preferences of Physicians with Regards to Rank-ordered Medical Documents. Paper presented at the Discovering the Preferences of Physicians with Regards to Rank-ordered Medical Documents.

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Abstract

The practice of evidence-based medicine involves consulting documents from repositories such as Scopus, PubMed, or the Cochrane Library. The most common approach for presenting retrieved documents is in the form of a list, with the assumption that the higher a document is on a list, the more relevant it is. Despite this list-based presentation, it is seldom studied how physicians perceive the importance of the order of documents presented in a list. This paper describes an empirical study that elicited and modeled physicians’ preferences with regard to list-based results. Preferences were analyzed using a GRIP method that relies on pairwise comparisons of selected subsets of possible rank-ordered lists composed of 3 documents. The results allow us to draw conclusions regarding physicians’ attitudes towards the importance of having documents ranked correctly on a result list, versus the importance of retrieving relevant but misplaced documents. Our findings should help developers of clinical information retrieval applications when deciding how retrieved documents should be presented and how performance of the application should be assessed.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
Uncontrolled Keywords: Physician preferences, Evidence-Based Medicine, Document Retrieval, Rank-ordered Lists, Information Retrieval.
Subjects: Q Science > QA Mathematics
Divisions: School of Engineering & Mathematical Sciences > Department of Mathematical Science
URI: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/11931

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