Health-related quality of life in people with aphasia: Implications for fluency disorders quality of life research

Cruice, M., Worrall, L. & Hickson, L. (2010). Health-related quality of life in people with aphasia: Implications for fluency disorders quality of life research. Journal of Fluency Disorders, 35(3), pp. 173-189. doi: 10.1016/j.jfludis.2010.05.008

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Abstract

Abstract

It is increasingly important that clinicians address the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of adults with communication disorders in clinical practice. The overall aim of this paper is to draw conclusion about the suitability of the Short Form 36 Health Survey for the communication disorders of aphasia and stuttering. This study reports on the impact of post-stroke aphasia on 30 Australian older adults’ HRQOL. It also comments on the capacity of the SF-36 to measure HRQOL in this population, specifically whether it is sensitive to the three known determinants of post-stroke HRQOL – emotional, physical and social functioning. Comparisons with other data are made to assist interpretation of the SF-36 subscale scores: with 75 older adults with no history of neurological conditions; and with data from the 1995 National Health Survey data. The main findings are: (1) adults with post-stroke aphasia have similar HRQOL to their peers on six subscales, but significantly lower Role emotional and Mental health HRQOL; (2) a substantial number of aphasic adults reported depressive mood; and (3) aphasic adults with depressive mood have significantly worse HRQOL on six subscales than aphasic adults without depressive mood, but similar Role emotional and Body pain HRQOL. In conclusion, stroke and aphasia have minimal impact on older adults’ HRQOL as measured by the SF-36, which conflicts with an established evidence base of the negative consequences of aphasia on life. Thus, the SF-36 is not advisable for use with aphasic adults. Implications of these findings for aphasia and stuttering are discussed.

Educational objectives: The reader will be able to: (a) describe the impact of aphasia and depressive mood on quality of life; (b) compare the impact of aphasia on the quality of life of adults to adults who do not have aphasia; (c) describe the similarities and differences between quality of life of adults with aphasia and adults who stutter; and (d) describe the strengths and limitations of the SF-36 as a measure of quality of life in adults who stutter versus adults with aphasia.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: © 2010 Crown Copyright. This paper is covered by the Open Government Licence for public sector information http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/doc/open-government-licence/.
Uncontrolled Keywords: Quality of life, Aphasia, Stuttering, SF-36, Depression, INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFICATION, STROKE SURVIVORS, COGNITIVE IMPAIRMENT, ISCHEMIC-STROKE, OLDER-PEOPLE, IMPACT, DISABILITY, DEPRESSION, SF-36, OUTCOMES
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine
Divisions: School of Health Sciences > Department of Language & Communication Science
URI: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/1207

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