Reporting on psychological well-being of older adults with chronic aphasia in the context of unaffected peers

Cruice, M., Worrall, L. & Hickson, L. (2011). Reporting on psychological well-being of older adults with chronic aphasia in the context of unaffected peers. Disability and Rehabilitation, 33(3), pp. 219-228. doi: 10.3109/09638288.2010.503835

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Abstract

Abstract
Purpose: It is important that professionals working with individuals with acquired neurogenic communication disorders consider their clients’ psychological wellbeing. Much is known about the significant emotional, social and psychological consequences of aphasia after stroke, however little is known about individuals’ psychological wellbeing. This paper reports the psychological wellbeing of community-dwelling older adults with chronic aphasia in the context of their unaffected peers.

Method: Thirty participants affected by aphasia and 75 unaffected participants completed the 24-item measure How I Feel About Myself drawn originally from Ryff (1989) and the Geriatric Depression Scale (Sheikh & Yesavage, 1986).
Results: Individuals with aphasia after stroke had statistically similar range and average psychological wellbeing as the unaffected population, with the exception of lower environmental mastery (independence) and lower mood. Furthermore, a substantial number of individuals (affected and unaffected) reported lower than average psychological wellbeing.

Conclusions: Many persons with chronic aphasia need support to manage the demands and responsibilities of their everyday lives and raise their mood. Clinicians need to be aware of this possibility and formally assess all persons with aphasia, as well as explore the potential impact of physical limitations. Identifying low well-being in older adults is important for all professionals working with the ageing population. The implications for speech and language therapy and for multi-disciplinary research and cross-sector joint working (health, social and community services) are discussed.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Well-being, aphasia, elderly, QUALITY-OF-LIFE, STROKE SURVIVORS, DEPRESSION, COMMUNICATION, PEOPLE, PARTICIPATION, CONSEQUENCES, RELATIVES, FAMILIES
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine
Divisions: School of Health Sciences > Department of Language & Communication Science
URI: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/1209

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