Vaginal cones or balls to improve pelvic floor muscle performance and urinary continence in women post partum: A quantitative systematic review

Oblasser, C., Christie, J. & McCourt, C. (2015). Vaginal cones or balls to improve pelvic floor muscle performance and urinary continence in women post partum: A quantitative systematic review. Midwifery, 31(11), pp. 1017-1025. doi: 10.1016/j.midw.2015.08.011

[img]
Preview
Text - Accepted Version
Available under License : See the attached licence file.

Download (735kB) | Preview
[img]
Preview
Text (Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Licence) - Other
Download (201kB) | Preview

Abstract

Objectives:
The vaginal use of cones or balls aims to increase muscle performance and thereby prevent or treat urinary incontinence. To date, no systematic review has focused on the effectiveness of these devices specifically during the postpartum period. The objectives of this review were: to compare the effectiveness of vaginal cones or balls for improvement of pelvic floor muscle performance and urinary continence in the postpartum period to no treatment, placebo, sham treatment or active controls; to gather information on effect on perineal descent or pelvic organ prolapse, adverse effects and economical aspects.

Design:
Quantitative systematic review

Data Sources:
14 scientific databases (including PubMed and CINAHL) and the world-wide web; experts were contacted for published and unpublished data.

Review Methods:
Studies had to be randomised/quasi-randomised trials and have female participants up to one year after childbirth. The intervention is compared to no treatment, placebo, sham treatment or active controls. Outcome measures relate to pelvic floor muscle performance or urinary incontinence. Studies were selected, “risk of bias” assessed, and data extracted by two reviewers independently with inter-reviewer agreement.

Main Findings:
One study met the inclusion criteria; its original data were re-analysed. In an intention-to-treat analysis, compared with the control group, the cone group showed a statistically significant lower rate of urinary incontinence; compared with the exercise group, the prevalence was similar. However, the validity of the analysis is limited.

Conclusions and implications:
The evidence gained from this systematic review is very limited. The use of cones may be helpful for urinary incontinence after childbirth, but further research is needed.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: © 2015, Elsevier. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Uncontrolled Keywords: health promotion, pelvic floor, postpartum period, review, urinary incontinence
Subjects: R Medicine > RG Gynecology and obstetrics
Divisions: School of Health Sciences > Department of Midwifery
URI: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/12500

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics