Role and task recommendation and social tagging to enable social business process management

Rangiha, M. E., Comuzzi, M. & Karakostas, B. (2015). Role and task recommendation and social tagging to enable social business process management. Lecture Notes in Business Information Processing, 214, pp. 68-82. doi: 10.1007/978-3-319-19237-6_5

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Abstract

Traditional Business Process Management (BPM) poses a number of limitations for the management of ad-hoc processes, where the execution paths are not designed a priori and evolve during enactment. Social BPM, which predicates to integrate social software into the BPM lifecycle, has emerged as an answer to such limitations. This paper presents a framework for social BPM in which social tagging is used to capture process knowledge emerging during the enactment and design of the processes. Process knowledge concerns both the type of activities chosen to fulfil a certain goal and the skills and experience of users in executing specific tasks. Such knowledge is exploited by recommendation tools to support the design and enactment of future process instances. We first provide an overview of our framework, introducing the concepts of role and task recommendations, which are supported by social tagging. These mechanisms are then elaborated further by an example. Eventually, we discuss a prototype of our framework enabling collaborative process design and execution.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: The final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-19237-6_5
Uncontrolled Keywords: Social BPM, Social Tagging, BPM, Task Recommendation, Process Knowledge
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HD Industries. Land use. Labor > HD28 Management. Industrial Management
Divisions: School of Informatics > Department of Computing
URI: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/12818

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