Providing immediate neonatal care and resuscitation at birth beside the mother: clinicians' views, a qualitative study

Yoxall, C. W., Ayers, S., Sawyer, A., Bertullies, S., Thomas, M., Weeks, A. D. & Duley, L. (2015). Providing immediate neonatal care and resuscitation at birth beside the mother: clinicians' views, a qualitative study. BMJ Open, 5(9), e008494. doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2015-008494

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Abstract

Objectives: The aims of this study were to assess clinicians’ views and experiences of providing immediate neonatal care at birth beside the mother, and of using a mobile trolley designed to facilitate this bedside care.

Design: Qualitative interview study with semistructured interviews.

Results: The results were analysed using thematic analysis.

Setting: A large UK maternity unit.

Participants: Clinicians (n=20) from a range of disciplines who were present when the trolley was used to provide neonatal care at birth at the bedside. Five clinicians provided/observed advanced resuscitation by the bedside.

Results: Five themes were identified: (1) Parents’ involvement, which included ‘Contact and involvement’, ‘Positive emotions for parents’ and ‘Staff communication’; (2) Reservations about neonatal care at birth beside the mother, which included ‘Impact on clinicians’ and ‘Impact on parents’; (3) Practical challenges in providing neonatal care at the bedside, which included ‘Cord length’ and ‘Caesarean section’; (4) Comparison of the trolley with usual resuscitation equipment and (5) Training and integration of bedside care into clinical routine, which included ‘Teething problems’ and ‘Training’.

Conclusions: Overall, most clinicians were positive about providing immediate neonatal care at the maternal bedside, particularly in terms of the clinicians’ perceptions of the parents’ experience. Clinicians also perceived that their close proximity to parents improved communication. However, there was some concern about performing more intensive interventions in front of parents. Providing immediate neonatal care and resuscitation at the bedside requires staff training and support.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Science & Technology; Life Sciences & Biomedicine; Medicine, General & Internal; General & Internal Medicine; FAMILY PRESENCE; PARENTS
Subjects: R Medicine
Divisions: School of Health Sciences
URI: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/13449

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