Combining qualitative methods to study collective cognition in organizations

Stigliani, I. & Ravasi, D. (2016). Combining qualitative methods to study collective cognition in organizations. In: E. Elsbach & R.M. Kramer (Eds.), Handbook of Qualitative Organizational Research: Innovative Pathways and Methods. (pp. 444-453). USA: Routledge. ISBN 9781848725096

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Abstract

In this chapter, we argue that combining different qualitative research methods can facilitate the study of collective cognition in organizations, thus compensating the limitations of more traditional approaches. Using our own research experience in studying how designers develop new ideas, we explain how the combined use of ethnography, grounded theory and visual narrative analysis allowed us to gain a deep understanding of how material practices influence collective cognitive sensemaking in organizations. In particular, we show (1) how ethnography allowed us to map and unpack the material practices designers engage in when developing new ideas, (2) how interviews and grounded theory helped us articulate informants’ interpretations of these practices and reveal the underlying cognitive processes, and, finally, (3) how visual narrative analysis was useful to systematically track changes in the evolving collective interpretations, and by doing so to link together practices and processes in a longitudinal fashion.

Item Type: Book Section
Additional Information: This is an Accepted Manuscript of a book chapter published by Routledge in Handbook of Qualitative Organizational Research: Innovative Pathways and Methods on 14/12/15, available online: https://www.routledgehandbooks.com/doi/10.4324/9781315849072;jsessionid=eOSb3OKcz3v1oGDmVSm0acTP
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HD Industries. Land use. Labor > HD28 Management. Industrial Management
Divisions: Cass Business School > Faculty of Management
URI: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/13919

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