“Emasculation nation has arrived”: sexism rearticulated in online responses to Lose the Lads’ Mags campaign

García-Favaro, L. & Gill, R. (2016). “Emasculation nation has arrived”: sexism rearticulated in online responses to Lose the Lads’ Mags campaign. Feminist Media Studies, 16(3), pp. 379-397. doi: 10.1080/14680777.2015.1105840

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Abstract

In the spring of 2013 a British feminist campaign sought to have men’s magazines, such as Zoo, Nuts, and Loaded, removed from the shelves of major retailers, arguing that they are sexist and objectify women. The campaign—known as Lose the Lads’ Mags (LTLM)—received extensive media coverage and was the topic of considerable public debate. Working with a data corpus comprising 5,140 reader comments posted on news websites in response to reporting of LTLM, this paper explores the repeated focus on men and masculinity as “attacked,” “under threat,” “victimised,” or “demonised” in what is depicted as a sinister new gender order. Drawing on a poststructuralist feminist discursive analysis, we show how these broad claims are underpinned by four interpretative repertoires that centre around: (i) gendered double standards; (ii) male (hetero)sexuality under threat; (iii) the war on the “normal bloke”; and (iv) the notion of feminism as unconcerned with equality but rather “out to get men.” This paper contributes to an understanding of (online) popular misogyny and changing modes of sexism.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Feminist Media Studies on 15 Nov 2015, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/14680777.2015.1105840
Uncontrolled Keywords: Men’s magazines, postfeminism, sexism, “sexualisation”, new media
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HM Sociology
Divisions: School of Social Sciences > Department of Sociology
URI: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/14459

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