Non-verbal executive function is mediated by language: A study of deaf and hearing children

Botting, N., Jones, A., Marshall, C., Denmark, T., Atkinson, J. & Morgan, G. (2016). Non-verbal executive function is mediated by language: A study of deaf and hearing children. Child Development,

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Abstract

Studies have suggested that language and Executive Function (EF) are strongly associated. Indeed, the two are difficult to separate, and it is particularly difficult to determine whether one skill is more dependent on the other. Deafness provides a unique opportunity to disentangle these skills because in this case, language difficulties have a sensory not cognitive basis. In this study, deaf (n=108) and hearing (n=125) children (age 8yrs) were assessed on language and a wide range of non-verbal EF tasks. Deaf children performed significantly less well on EF tasks, even controlling for nonverbal intelligence and speed of processing. Language mediated EF skill, but the reverse pattern was not evident. Findings suggest that language is key to EF performance rather than vice-versa

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Botting, NF, Jones, A, Marshall, C, Denmark, T, Atkinson, J & Morgan, G (2016) Non-verbal executive function is mediated by language: A study of deaf and hearing children. Child Development, which is to be published in final form at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/%28ISSN%291467-8624. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.
Subjects: P Language and Literature > P Philology. Linguistics
Divisions: School of Health Sciences > Department of Language & Communication Science
URI: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/15000

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