Do Women Ask?

Artz, B. M., Goodall, A. H. & Oswald, A. J. (2016). Do Women Ask? (Report No. 10183). Germany: Deutsche Post STIFTUNG.

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Abstract

Women typically earn less than men. The reasons are not fully understood. Previous studies argue that this may be because (i) women ‘don’t ask’ and (ii) the reason they fail to ask is out of concern for the quality of their relationships at work. This account is difficult to assess with standard labor-economics data sets. Hence we examine direct survey evidence. Using matched employer-employee data from 2013-14, the paper finds that the women-don’t-ask account is incorrect. Once an hours-of-work variable is included in ‘asking’ equations, hypotheses (i) and (ii) can be rejected. Women do ask. However, women do not get.

Item Type: Monograph (Working Paper)
Additional Information: This is the pre-peer reviewed version of the following article: Artz, B. M., Goodall, A. H. & Oswald, A. J. (2018). Do Women Ask?. Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, which is to be published in final form at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1468-232X. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.
Uncontrolled Keywords: matched employer-employee data; female discrimination; wages; gender
Divisions: Cass Business School > Faculty of Management
URI: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/15273

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