Paris, Wall Street: Reflections on the Political Crowd and Labelling World Historical Events

Rojek, C. (2016). Paris, Wall Street: Reflections on the Political Crowd and Labelling World Historical Events. The Sociological Review,

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Abstract

This paper examines the political crowd as a World Historical Event (WHE). Historian’s define the latter as an episode, incident or emergency that transforms the course of history. The paper examines Hayden White’s discussion of the WHE and the grounds he submits for separating it from pseudo-events. Namely, the identification of collective trauma and the attribution of the episode as the fulfilment or ‘filling out’ of an historical sequence. The paper offers a preliminary taxonomy and concentrates on the non violent political crowd protest. It examines Occupy (2011) as a World Historical Event. It draws comparisons between Occupy, the Paris Commune (1871) and the May Spring in Paris (1968). The aim is to set the evidence about Occupy as a World Historical Event against claims made on its behalf by the media of the day and leading political and social commentators, notably David Harvey, Todd Gitlin, Cornell West and Noam Chomsky. The concept of ‘Event inflation’ is introduced and the claim that World Historical Events can only be determined by retrospective (historical) wisdom is advanced.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This is the pre-peer reviewed version of the following article: Rojek, C. Paris, Wall Street: Reflections on the Political Crowd and Labelling World Historical Events. The Sociological Review,, which is to be published in final form at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1467-954X/. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.
Uncontrolled Keywords: Events, Occupy, Political Crowd, Non-Violent Process, Event Inflation
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HM Sociology
Divisions: School of Social Sciences > Department of Sociology
URI: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/15711

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