Expertise and the interpretation of computerized physiological data: implications for the design of computerized monitoring in neonatal intensive care

Alberdi, E., Becher, J.-C., Gilhooly, K. J., Hunter, J., Logie, R., Lyon, A., McIntosh, N. & Reiss, J. (2001). Expertise and the interpretation of computerized physiological data: implications for the design of computerized monitoring in neonatal intensive care. International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, 55(3), pp. 191-216. doi: 10.1006/ijhc.2001.0477

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Abstract

This paper presents the outcomes from a cognitive engineering project addressing the design problems of computerized monitoring in neonatal intensive care. Cognitive engineering is viewed, in this project, as a symbiosis between cognitive science and design practice. A range of methodologies has been used: interviews with neonatal staff, ward observations and experimental techniques. The results of these investigations are reported, focusing specifically on the differences between junior and senior physicians in their interpretation of monitored physiological data. It was found that the senior doctors made better use of the different knowledge sources available than the junior doctors. The senior doctors were able to identify more relevant physiological patterns and generated more and better inferences than did their junior colleagues. Expertise differences are discussed in the context of previous psychological research in medical expertise. Finally, the paper discusses the potential utility of these outcomes to inform the design of computerized decision support in neonatal intensive care.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: Q Science > QA Mathematics > QA75 Electronic computers. Computer science
R Medicine > RG Gynecology and obstetrics
Divisions: School of Informatics > Centre for Software Reliability
URI: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/1587

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