The relative emphasis on supply-chain/logistics topics by UK industry in hiring postgraduates and by UK universities in teaching and research

Bourlakis, M., Sodhi, M. & Son, B.G. (2013). The relative emphasis on supply-chain/logistics topics by UK industry in hiring postgraduates and by UK universities in teaching and research. International Journal of Logistics Research and Applications, 16(6), pp. 506-521. doi: 10.1080/13675567.2013.841134

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Abstract

We examine how UK universities view different topics within supply-chain management as seen in their research output and their postgraduate curricula and whether this view matches the relative emphasis on these aspects by UK-based employers when hiring. Using content analysis, we analysed: (1) UK-based supply-chain/logistics job advertisements, (2) abstracts of research articles by UK academics in supply-chain/logistics journals, and (3) the description of the postgraduate-level supply-chain/logistics degrees in UK universities. Our findings show that the overall research output of UK universities is broadly in line with employers' needs with regards to the relative emphasis on different supply-chain topics. However, their relative emphasis on these topics in their teaching programmes is quite different. We suggest that universities need to look into their provision of academic programmes in relation to employers' needs and need to look into how to leverage their research output better for this purpose.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in International Journal of Logistics Research and Applications on 22/10/2013, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/13675567.2013.841134.
Uncontrolled Keywords: postgraduate programmes, supply chain/logistics, employer needs, job advertisements, UK
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HD Industries. Land use. Labor > HD28 Management. Industrial Management
L Education > L Education (General)
Divisions: Cass Business School > Faculty of Management
URI: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/17137

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