Understanding pretence and understanding action

Berguno, G. & Bowler, D. M. (2004). Understanding pretence and understanding action. British Journal of Developmental Psychology, 22(4), pp. 531-544. doi: 10.1348/0261510042378254

[img]
Preview
Text - Accepted Version
Download (767kB) | Preview

Abstract

Two studies were carried out in an attempt to replicate an earlier but controversial set of findings that suggested that young children are able to understand pretence in a mentalistic sense (Hickling, Wellman, & Gottfried, 1997). In Study 1, 65 three-year-olds and 77 four-year-olds were asked to either judge the thoughts of an absent teddy bear, who had not witnessed a change in the original pretence stipulation, or were asked to complete a similar, standard false-belief task. Study 2 repeated the experimental procedures of the first study with 24 three-year-olds and 16 four-year-olds, with the difference that all children had to complete both tasks in a single session. The results obtained across both studies showed that 3-year-olds were unable to correctly judge the discrepant thoughts of the teddy bear, suggesting that young children do not attribute a false belief to another actor during pretend play, and that instead they view pretence in terms of overt action.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Berguno, G. & Bowler, D. M. (2004). Understanding pretence and understanding action. British Journal of Developmental Psychology, 22(4), pp. 531-544., which has been published in final form at http://dx.doi.org/10.1348/0261510042378254. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.
Divisions: School of Social Sciences > Department of Psychology
URI: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/17579

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics