Diagnosis and management of perinatal depression and anxiety in general practice: a meta-synthesis of qualitative studies

Ford, E., Lee, S., Shakespeare, J. & Ayers, S. (2017). Diagnosis and management of perinatal depression and anxiety in general practice: a meta-synthesis of qualitative studies. British Journal of General Practice, 67(661), e538-e546. doi: 10.3399/bjgp17X691889

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Up to 20% of women experience anxiety and depression during the perinatal period. In the UK, management of perinatal mental health falls under the remit of GPs.

AIM: This review aimed at synthesising the available information from qualitative studies on GPs' attitudes, recognition, and management of perinatal anxiety and depression.

DESIGN AND SETTING: Meta-synthesis of the available published qualitative evidence on GPs' recognition and management of perinatal anxiety and depression.

METHOD: A systematic search was conducted on Embase, Medline, PsycInfo, Pubmed, Scopus, and Web of Science, and grey literature was searched using Google, Google Scholar, and British Library EThOS. Papers and reports were eligible for inclusion if they reported qualitatively on GPs' diagnosis or treatment of perinatal anxiety or depression. The synthesis was constructed using meta-ethnography.

RESULTS: Five themes were established from five eligible papers: labels: diagnosing depression; clinical judgement versus guidelines; care and management; use of medication; and isolation: the role of other professionals. GPs considered perinatal depression to be a psychosocial phenomenon, and were reluctant to label disorders and medicalise distress. GPs relied on their own clinical judgement more than guidelines. They reported helping patients make informed choices about treatment, and inviting them back regularly for GP visits. GPs sometimes felt isolated when dealing with perinatal mental health issues.

CONCLUSION: GPs often do not have timely access to appropriate psychological therapies and use several strategies to mitigate this shortfall. Training must focus on these issues and must be evaluated to consider whether this makes a difference to outcomes for patients.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: R Medicine > RG Gynecology and obstetrics
Divisions: School of Health Sciences > Department of Midwifery
School of Health Sciences > Department of Radiography
URI: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/17852

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