A Qualitative Analysis of Experiential Challenges Associated with Meditation Practice

Lomas, T., Cartwright, T., Edginton, T. & Ridge, D. (2015). A Qualitative Analysis of Experiential Challenges Associated with Meditation Practice. Mindfulness, 6(4), pp. 848-860. doi: 10.1007/s12671-014-0329-8

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Abstract

Although empirical interest in meditation has flourished in recent years, few studies have addressed possible downsides of meditation practice, particularly in community populations. In-depth interviews were conducted with 30 male meditators in London, UK, recruited using principles of maximum variation sampling, and analysed using a modified constant comparison approach. Having originally set out simply to inquire about the impact of various meditation practices (including but not limited to mindfulness) on men’s wellbeing, we uncovered psychological challenges associated with its practice. While meditation was generally reported to be conducive to wellbeing, substantial difficulties accounted for approximately one quarter of the interview data. Our paper focuses specifically on these issues in order to alert health professionals to potential challenges associated with meditation. Four main problems of increasing severity were uncovered: Meditation was a difficult skill to learn and practise; participants encountered troubling thoughts and feelings which were hard to manage; meditation reportedly exacerbated mental health issues, such as depression and anxiety; and in a few cases, meditation was associated with psychotic episodes. Our paper raises important issues around safeguarding those who practise meditation, both within therapeutic settings and in the community.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: The final publication is available at Springer via https://doi.org/10.1007/s12671-014-0329-8
Uncontrolled Keywords: Masculinity; Men; Meditation; Mindfulness; Mental health; Wellbeing
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: School of Social Sciences > Department of Psychology
URI: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/18130

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