Goal conflict, goal facilitation and health professionals’ provision of physical activity advice in primary care: An exploratory prospective study

Presseau, J., Francis, J., Campbell, N. C. & Sniehotta, F. F. (2011). Goal conflict, goal facilitation and health professionals’ provision of physical activity advice in primary care: An exploratory prospective study. Implementation Science, 6, 73 - ?.

[img]
Preview
PDF
Download (269kB) | Preview

Abstract

Background: The theory of planned behaviour has well-evidenced utility in predicting health professional behaviour, but focuses on a single behaviour isolated from the numerous potentially conflicting and facilitating goal-directed behaviours performed alongside. Goal conflict and goal facilitation may influence whether health professionals engage in guideline-recommended behaviours, and may supplement the predictive power of the theory of planned behaviour. We hypothesised that goal facilitation and goal conflict contribute to predicting primary care health professionals’ provision of physical activity advice to patients with hypertension, over and above predictors of behaviour from the theory of planned behaviour.

Methods: Using a prospective predictive design, at baseline we invited a random sample of 606 primary care health professionals from all primary care practices in NHS Grampian and NHS Tayside (Scotland) to complete postal questionnaires. Goal facilitation and goal conflict were measured alongside theory of planned behaviour constructs at baseline. At follow-up six months later, participants self-reported the number of patients, out of those seen in the preceding two weeks, to whom they provided physical activity advice.

Results: Forty-four primary care physicians and nurses completed measures at both time points (7.3% response rate). Goal facilitation and goal conflict improved the prediction of behaviour, accounting for substantial additional variance (5.8% and 8.4%, respectively) in behaviour over and above intention and perceived behavioural control.

Conclusions: Health professionals’ provision of physical activity advice in primary care can be predicted by perceptions about how their conflicting and facilitating goal-directed behaviours help and hinder giving advice, over and above theory of planned behaviour constructs. Incorporating features of multiple goal pursuit into the theory of planned behaviour may help to better understand health professional behaviour.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine
Divisions: School of Health Sciences > Healthcare Research Unit
URI: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/1866

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics