Theorizing Digital Journalism: The Limits of Linearity and the Rise of Relationships

Singer, J. (2017). Theorizing Digital Journalism: The Limits of Linearity and the Rise of Relationships. In: S. A. Eldridge II & B. Franklin (Eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Developments in Digital Journalism Studies. . London: Routledge. ISBN 9781138283053

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Abstract

For more than 50 years, our understanding of journalism drew on theories that emerged in an environment in which the components of a mediated message could be isolated well enough to measure and track. Yet today we live in a media world that is simultaneously immersive and interconnected, instantaneous and iterative, and individualized to an extent unimaginable a generation ago. In this environment, theories positing ‘media effects’ are considerably less practical or meaningful than they once were, a topic explored in the first half of this chapter. Some of the ways that contemporary journalism scholars are actively recontextualizing the field are then outlined, followed by consideration of the proposition that our best hope for understanding the “effects” of digital journalism may be to focus on the diversity of relationships it engenders. Looking at connections and interactions can profitably guide our study of this fluid, holistic media world.

Item Type: Book Section
Additional Information: This is an Accepted Manuscript of a book chapter to be published by Routledge in Routledge Handbook of Developments in Digital Journalism Studies and to be available online at https://www.routledge.com/
Divisions: School of Arts > Department of Journalism
URI: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/18704

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