CETA and Global Governance Law: What Kind of Model Agreement Is It Really in Law?

Fahey, E. (2017). CETA and Global Governance Law: What Kind of Model Agreement Is It Really in Law?. European Papers, 2(1), pp. 293-302. doi: 10.15166/2499-8249/119

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Abstract

The EU-Canada Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) provides for the free movement of goods, persons and capital to various degrees and its depth and breadth remain to be seen, as a high profile next generation WTO plus Agreement. CETA may well become a model for future mega regionals, for reasons of its new model and scope. It is quite significant that CETA and the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) are treated as related agreements. TTIP and TPP signified a shift towards the regulatory structures of the so-called mega regionals. The evolution of CETA as a survivor of a new form of second generation free trade agreement achieves all the more prominence for its efforts. As a result, while modest enough in relative terms in contrast with TTIP or CETA it is still an important effort to integrate developed legal orders and construct new configurations of global governance. This account thus considers the nature and substance of CETA. Section I the background to the CETA negotiations, ratification challenges, the aims and benefits of the text, followed by in Section II, detailed consideration of its legal provisions and Conclusions.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: global governance, mega regionals, integration, EU law, international relations, CETA
Divisions: The City Law School > The City Law School - Academic Programmes
URI: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/18746

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