Promotion of health and prevention of ill-health for Camden's older citizens: the systematic use of existing administrative data to examine the relationship between health, contact with social services and socio-economic characteristics

Tavakoly, B. (2008). Promotion of health and prevention of ill-health for Camden's older citizens: the systematic use of existing administrative data to examine the relationship between health, contact with social services and socio-economic characteristics. (Unpublished Doctoral thesis, City University London)

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Abstract

This study investigates the relationship between mortality and a number of factors drawn from existing administrative databases including gender, housing tenure, council tax bands (a proxy of wealth) and three popular causes of hospital admission (falls, strokes and ischemic-heart disease) for Camden residents aged 50 years and older. The study also includes an assessment of information on social service contact in order to identify the potential and/or the effectiveness of service delivery.

Existing data sources are merged using a relational database management systems approach. Risks of mortality are examined for different combinations of factors (Risk Ladders). The relative importance of risk factors are assessed by logistic regression and the model's ability to discriminate between 'those subjects who experience the outcome of interest versus those who do not', are also evaluated by use of Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) Curves.

The risk of mortality is more likely to occur for people living in social housing and lower council tax bands (A-C) than private housing and higher tax bands (D-H) and for men rather than women. However, the effect of tenure varies for different age groups, gender and tax band. The risk of mortality significantly increases for those groups of individuals who had at least one hospital admission for any of the three causes during 2002-04. Our results show the extent to which contact with social services is aligned with mortality risk among this age group with consequent implications for how social services are organised and delivered.

Publication Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HM Sociology
H Social Sciences > HV Social pathology. Social and public welfare
Departments: Doctoral Theses
School of Arts & Social Sciences > Sociology
Doctoral Theses > School of Arts and Social Sciences
URI: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/19616

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