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Exploring student nurses' attitudes towards those who are obese and whether these attitudes change following a simulated activity

Hunter, J., Rawlings-Anderson, K., Lindsay, T., Bowden, T. and Aitken, L. M. ORCID: 0000-0001-5722-9090 (2018). Exploring student nurses' attitudes towards those who are obese and whether these attitudes change following a simulated activity. Nurse Education Today, 65, pp. 225-231. doi: 10.1016/j.nedt.2018.03.013

Abstract

BACKGROUND: As the prevalence of obesity increases worldwide the field of bariatric medicine has emerged, focussing on the causes, prevention and treatment of obesity. People who are obese regularly face bias from healthcare professionals, which can negativity impact on care delivery and patient outcomes. The introduction of bariatric empathy suits into simulated practice may enable student nurses to appreciate the needs of, and influence their attitudes towards, obese people.

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to explore student nurses' attitudes towards those who are obese and whether these attitudes change following a simulated activity.

DESIGN: A mixed methods study incorporating a pre-post design.

SETTING: A UK university which provides pre-registration nursing education.

PARTICIPANTS: Nursing students in part 1 (n = 39) and part 2 (n = 29) in adult and mental health fields.

METHODS: Part 1 and 2 nursing students completed the "Nurses' attitudes towards obesity and obese patients scale" (NATOOPS) questionnaire. Part 2 students also took part in a simulation activity while wearing a bariatric empathy suit and completed the NATOOPS questionnaire again immediately after the simulation activity. Students who wore the empathy suits were invited to a focus group.

RESULTS: Part 1 students reported poorer attitudes on the NATOOPS scale than Part 2 students. After wearing the bariatric empathy suits students reported changed attitudes on the NATOOPS in three areas: response to obese patients, characteristics of obese patients and supportive roles in caring for obese patients. Five themes emerged from the focus groups related to physical and psychological impact of the suits; thinking differently; simulation as a learning experience and challenges and recommendations.

CONCLUSIONS: Following a structured educational experience student nurses' attitudes were more positive towards obese patients. The characteristics of the educational activity that appeared to influence student nurses' attitudes was related to the "lived experience" of wearing bariatric empathy suits.

Publication Type: Article
Additional Information: © 2018, Elsevier. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Publisher Keywords: Student nurse, Attitudes, Empathy, Obesity, Simulation
Departments: School of Health Sciences > Nursing
URI: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/19653
[img] Text - Accepted Version
This document is not freely accessible until 22 March 2019 due to copyright restrictions.
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives.

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