Copyright literacy in the UK: Understanding library and information professionals’ experiences of copyright

Secker, J. & Morrison, C. (2018). Copyright literacy in the UK: Understanding library and information professionals’ experiences of copyright. In: A Framework for Creative Visualization-Opportunities Workshops. (pp. 95-108). New York: Taylor & Francis. ISBN 9781317268352

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Abstract

This chapter reports on research to investigate the “copyright literacy” of librarians in the UK. Based on a survey and focus groups, undertaken following reform of copyright legislation in the UK in 2014, it originated from a European study. The research highlights gaps in knowledge, identifies training requirements in the sector, and suggests library and information science (LIS) qualifications and continuing professional development (CPD) need to address a greater range of topics related to copyright and intellectual property rights. The data also suggests that copyright is a source of anxiety for many librarians. Following the survey, a follow-up qualitative study was undertaken, using phenomenography as a way of exploring in detail librarians’ varying experiences of copyright. The chapter concludes by discussing how copyright might form a key component of the wider digital and information literacies taught by librarians. It also discusses how games based learning might be a valuable approach to copyright education.

Publication Type: Book Section
Additional Information: This is an Accepted Manuscript of a book chapter published by Routledge in A Framework for Creative Visualization-Opportunities Workshops on 15 February 2018, available online: http://www.routledge.com/9781317268352
Subjects: L Education
Z Bibliography. Library Science. Information Resources > Z665 Library Science. Information Science
Departments: Professional Services > Learning, Enhancement and Development
URI: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/20082

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