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Feeling the pressure - Initial results from a shopping centre/mall Pop-Up for screening intra-ocular pressure (IOP) across England

Edwards, L., Taylor, D. J. ORCID: 0000-0001-8261-5225, Shah, R. ORCID: 0000-0002-6134-0936, Campbell, P. ORCID: 0000-0002-6019-1596, Edgar, D. F ORCID: 0000-0001-9004-264X and Crabb, D. P. ORCID: 0000-0001-8754-3902 (2019). Feeling the pressure - Initial results from a shopping centre/mall Pop-Up for screening intra-ocular pressure (IOP) across England. Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science, 59(9), doi: 10.1186/s12889-018-6370-0

Abstract

Background: Improving detection of elevated blood pressure (BP) remains a public health need. We present results from a Pop-Up health check stationed in shopping centres in England. We hypothesise the rate of case detection is related to measurable ‘unhealthiness’ of the shopping centres.

Methods: A Pop-Up health check was sited in four and three shopping centres sampled from the top ten unhealthiest and top 15 healthiest shopping regions respectively, following a report ranking towns/cities based on their unhealthy and healthy retail outlets. On one day in each shopping centre, people were approached and consented to BP testing.
Outcome measure was people flagged with BP ≥ 140/90mmHg (cases).

Results: We detected 45 (22.6%) and 20 (13.1%) cases from testing 199 and 152 adults in the unhealthy and healthy locations respectively (relative risk 1.72; 95% confidence interval: 1.06 to 2.78). A measure of unhealthy retail outlets (e.g. fast-food outlets) within each shopping centre was associated with detection rate (R2 = 0.61; p = 0.04).

Conclusion: An association exists between cases of suspect hypertension found in a health check Pop-Up and measured ‘unhealthiness’ of the shopping centre site. Results hint at strategies for public testing of BP, potentially in the context of reducing health inequalities.

Publication Type: Article
Additional Information: © The Author(s). 2019 Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
Departments: School of Health Sciences > Optometry & Visual Science
URI: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/21753
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