In vivo optical investigation of short term skin water contact and moisturizer application using NIR spectroscopy

Qassem, M. & Kyriacou, P. A. (2013). In vivo optical investigation of short term skin water contact and moisturizer application using NIR spectroscopy. Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc, 2013, pp. 2392-2395. doi: 10.1109/EMBC.2013.6610020 ISSN 1557-170X

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Abstract

Nowadays, a number of noninvasive methods and instruments are available to inspect the biophysical properties and effects of various applicants on human skin, providing quantitative measurements and more details regarding the interactions between skin and various products. Such methods include Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS), a technique which over the years, has gained quite a reputation in being able to accurately determine moisture levels and water contents due to its sensitivity to hydrogen bonding. This paper reports preliminary results of an in vivo study carried out on the skin of a small number of human participants, investigating the optical response of human skin after direct short-term contact with water followed by application of a moisturizer, using a highly advanced spectrophotometer in the region of 900-2100nm, and equipped with a reflectance fibre optic probe. Results obtained here certainly raise some questions regarding the optical characteristics of different skin types and the influence of frequent moisturizer use, as well as the varying response between different water bands in the NIR region. Future work will focus on gaining more knowledge about these, in order to further improve optical skin measurements, and hopefully support the design and development of a portable and/or miniaturized optical device that could provide reliable, accurate and fast skin hydration readings in real time.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
Subjects: R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
Divisions: School of Engineering & Mathematical Sciences > Engineering
URI: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/3536

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