The Effects of Maltreatment and Neuroendocrine Regulation on Memory Performance

Cicchetti, D., Rogosch, F. A., Howe, M. L. & Toth, S. L. (2010). The Effects of Maltreatment and Neuroendocrine Regulation on Memory Performance. Child Development, 81(5), pp. 1504-1519. doi: 10.1111/j.1467-8624.2010.01488.x

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Abstract

This investigation examined basic memory processes, cortisol, and dissociation in maltreated children. School-aged children, 143 maltreated and 174 nonmaltreated, were administered the California Verbal Learning Test – Children (Delis, Kramer, Kaplan, & Ober, 1994) in a week-long camp setting, daily morning cortisol levels were assessed throughout the duration of camp, and behavioral symptoms were evaluated. Maltreatment and cortisol regulation were not related to short- or long-delay recall or recognition memory. However, children experiencing neglect/emotional maltreatment and low cortisol evinced heightened false recognition memory. Dissociative symptoms were higher in maltreated children; however, high dissociation was related to recognition inaccuracy only among nonmaltreated children. Results highlight the interplay between maltreatment and hypocortisolism in children’s recognition memory errors.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This is the accepted version of the following article: Cicchetti, D, Rogosch, FA, Howe, ML & Toth, SL (2010). The Effects of Maltreatment and Neuroendocrine Regulation on Memory Performance. CHILD DEVELOPMENT, 81(5), pp. 1504-1519., which has been published in final form at http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8624.2010.01488.x
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC0321 Neuroscience. Biological psychiatry. Neuropsychiatry
Divisions: School of Social Sciences > Department of Psychology
Related URLs:
URI: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/4209

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