Which Behaviour Change Techniques Are Most Effective at Increasing Older Adults’ Self-Efficacy and Physical Activity Behaviour? A Systematic Review

French, D. P., Olander, E. K., Chisholm, A. & McSharry, J. (2014). Which Behaviour Change Techniques Are Most Effective at Increasing Older Adults’ Self-Efficacy and Physical Activity Behaviour? A Systematic Review. Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 48(2), pp. 225-234. doi: 10.1007/s12160-014-9593-z

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Abstract

Background: Increasing self-efficacy is an effective mechanism for increasing physical activity, especially for older people.

Purpose: The aim of this review was to identify behaviour change techniques (BCTs) that increase self-efficacy and physical activity behaviour in non-clinical community-dwelling adults 60 years or over.

Methods: A systematic search identified 24 eligible studies reporting change in self-efficacy for physical activity following an intervention. Moderator analyses examined whether the inclusion of specific BCTs (as defined by CALO-RE taxonomy) was associated with changes in self-efficacy and physical activity behaviour.

Results: Overall, interventions increased self-efficacy (d = 0.37) and physical activity (d = 0.14). Self-regulatory techniques such as setting behavioural goals, prompting self-monitoring of behaviour, planning for relapses, providing normative information and providing feedback on performance were associated with lower levels of both self-efficacy and physical activity.

Conclusions: Many commonly used self-regulation intervention techniques that are effective for younger adults may not be effective for older adults.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: The final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12160-014-9593-z
Uncontrolled Keywords: Self-efficacy, Physical activity, Systematic review, Older adults, Behaviour change techniques, Meta-analysis
Subjects: R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine
Divisions: School of Health Sciences > Department of Child Health & Children's Nursing
URI: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/4248

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