Shame and self-acceptance in continued flux: qualitative study of the embodied experience of significant weight loss and removal of resultant excess skin by plastic surgery

Smith, F. & Farrants, J.R. (2013). Shame and self-acceptance in continued flux: qualitative study of the embodied experience of significant weight loss and removal of resultant excess skin by plastic surgery. British Journal of Health Psychology, 18(9), pp. 1129-1140. doi: 10.1177/1359105312459095

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Abstract

This study explored the embodied experience of body change using a qualitative design. Eight previous plastic surgery patients of a London hospital took part in in-depth, semi-structured interviews 1 year post a plastic surgery procedure to remove excess skin around their abdomen, resulting from weight loss. Participant interviews were analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. Two sub-themes titled 'Shame of the hidden body' and 'Lack of acceptance; the future focused body' are presented in this article. Findings are considered in relation to theories of 'Body Shame' and in the current cultural context.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis, appearance, body image, body shape, obesity, Abdominoplasty, Adult, Body Image, Dermatologic Surgical Procedures, Female, Humans, London, Middle Aged, Obesity, Qualitative Research, Self Concept, Shame, Weight Loss
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: School of Social Sciences > Department of Psychology
URI: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/4556

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