Factors associated with self-efficacy for managing recovery in the trauma intensive care population: A prospective cohort study

Connolly, F. R., Aitken, L. M., Tower, M. & Macfarlane, B. (2014). Factors associated with self-efficacy for managing recovery in the trauma intensive care population: A prospective cohort study. Injury, 45(1), pp. 272-278. doi: 10.1016/j.injury.2013.05.005

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Abstract

Objective: The aim of this paper was to identify factors associated with self-efficacy for managing recovery in the trauma intensive care population.

Introduction: Injury accounts for 6.5% of disease burden in Australia, with similar levels being reported in other developed countries. While some studies regarding self-efficacy have identified a relationship to patient recovery post acute injury, others have been inconclusive. This study will identify factors associated with self-efficacy for managing recovery in the trauma intensive care population.

Methods: A prospective cohort study of patients aged ≥18 years, admitted to a metropolitan tertiary hospital in South East Queensland between June 2008 and August 2010 for the acute treatment of injury. Demographic, injury, acute care and psychosocial factors were considered. The primary outcome was self-efficacy measured by the 6-item self-efficacy scale (SES) 1 and 6 months post hospital discharge. All factors significant (p < 0.10) on univariate analysis were included in multivariable modelling where p < 0.05 was considered significant.

Results: A total of 88 patients were included. The mean self-efficacy score at 1 and 6 months was similar (6.8 vs 6.9 respectively). Self-efficacy at 1 month, psychological distress (K-10) Score and illness perception (K10) Score accounted for 68.4% (adjusted R2) of the variance in 6 month self-efficacy (F3,75) = 57.17, p < 0.001. Illness perception was the strongest contributor to 6 month self-efficacy (beta = −0.516), followed by psychological distress (beta = −0.243) and self-efficacy at 1 month (beta = 0.205).

Conclusion: Significant factors associated with self-efficacy for managing recovery at 6 months included 1 month self-efficacy, illness perception and psychological distress. To promote patient recovery, screening patients at 1 month in order to commence relevant interventions could be beneficial.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: NOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Injury. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Injury Volume 45, Issue 1, January 2014, Pages 272–278, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.injury.2013.05.005
Uncontrolled Keywords: Self-efficacy, Psychosocial factors, Trauma, Injury, Intensive care unit, Quality of life, Nurses; Nursing, Recovery, Patient outcome
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine
Divisions: School of Health Sciences > Healthcare Research Unit
Related URLs:
URI: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/4583

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