Neutrophil-delivered myeloperoxidase dampens the hydrogen peroxide burst after tissue wounding in zebrafish

Pase, L., Layton, J. E., Wittmann, C., Ellett, F., Nowell, C. J., Reyes-Aldasoro, C. C., Varma, S., Rogers, K. L., Hall, C. J., Keightley, M. C., Crosier, P. S., Grabher, C., Heath, J. K., Renshaw, S. A. & Lieschke, G. J. (2012). Neutrophil-delivered myeloperoxidase dampens the hydrogen peroxide burst after tissue wounding in zebrafish. Current Biology, 22(19), pp. 1818-1824. doi: 10.1016/j.cub.2012.07.060

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Abstract

Prompt neutrophil arrival is critical for host defense immediately after injury [1-3]. Following wounding, a hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) burst generated in injured tissues is the earliest known leukocyte chemoattractant [4]. Generating this tissue-scale H(2)O(2) gradient uses dual oxidase [4] and neutrophils sense H(2)O(2) by a mechanism involving the LYN Src-family kinase [5], but the molecular mechanisms responsible for H(2)O(2) clearance are unknown [6]. Neutrophils carry abundant amounts of myeloperoxidase, an enzyme catalyzing an H(2)O(2)-consuming reaction [7, 8]. We hypothesized that this neutrophil-delivered myeloperoxidase downregulates the high tissue H(2)O(2) concentrations that follow wounding. This was tested in zebrafish using simultaneous fluorophore-based imaging of H(2)O(2) concentrations and leukocytes [4, 9-11] and a new neutrophil-replete but myeloperoxidase-deficient mutant (durif). Leukocyte-depleted zebrafish had an abnormally sustained wound H(2)O(2) burst, indicating that leukocytes themselves were required for H(2)O(2) downregulation. Myeloperoxidase-deficient zebrafish also had abnormally sustained high wound H(2)O(2) concentrations despite similar numbers of arriving neutrophils. A local H(2)O(2)/myeloperoxidase interaction within wound-recruited neutrophils was demonstrated. These data demonstrate that leukocyte-delivered myeloperoxidase cell-autonomously downregulates tissue-generated wound H(2)O(2) gradients in vivo, defining a new requirement for myeloperoxidase during inflammation. Durif provides a new animal model of myeloperoxidase deficiency closely phenocopying the prevalent human disorder [7, 12, 13], offering unique possibilities for investigating its clinical consequences.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: NOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Current Biology. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Current Biology, Volume 22, Issue 19, 9 October 2012, Pages 1818–1824, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2012.07.060.
Uncontrolled Keywords: Animals, Animals, Genetically Modified, Hydrogen Peroxide, Leukocytes, Mutation, Neutrophil Infiltration, Neutrophils, Peroxidase, Zebrafish
Subjects: R Medicine > RM Therapeutics. Pharmacology
T Technology > T Technology (General)
Divisions: School of Engineering & Mathematical Sciences > Engineering
Related URLs:
URI: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/4590

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