Exploring entrepreneurial learning: A comparative study of technology development projects

Ravasi, D. & Turati, C. (2005). Exploring entrepreneurial learning: A comparative study of technology development projects. Journal of Business Venturing, 20(1), pp. 137-164. doi: 10.1016/j.jbusvent.2003.11.002

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Abstract

In this paper, we report findings from a comparative study of factors that influence the learning process that underlies entrepreneurial innovation, as entrepreneurs move from an initial intuition to a well-developed new product or service. Evidence from our comparative study highlights the self-reinforcing effect of prior related knowledge, perceived incentives and the degree of control on the allocation of entrepreneurs' limited time, attention and resources. Combining theory and evidence from our study, we propose an interpretative model that suggests that innovation in entrepreneurial ventures rests on self-reinforcing learning cycles that lead entrepreneurs to dedicate increasing resources to the exploration of some opportunities at the expense of others, following a sensemaking process affected by their previous knowledge and their degree of involvement in the projects.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: NOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of Business Venturing. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Journal of Business Venturing, Volume 20, Issue 1, January 2005, Pages 137–164, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jbusvent.2003.11.002.
Uncontrolled Keywords: Entrepreneurial learning, Technology development projects, Corporate venturing
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HD Industries. Land use. Labor > HD28 Management. Industrial Management
Divisions: Cass Business School > Faculty of Management
URI: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/4598

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