Using Eye Tracking to Assess Reading Performance in Patients with Glaucoma: A Within-Person Study

Smith, N. D., Glen, F., Moenter, V. M. & Crabb, D. P. (2014). Using Eye Tracking to Assess Reading Performance in Patients with Glaucoma: A Within-Person Study. Journal of Ophthalmology, 2014, p. 120528. doi: 10.1155/2014/120528

[img]
Preview
Text - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons: Attribution-Noncommercial 3.0.

Download (4MB) | Preview

Abstract

Reading is often cited as a demanding task for patients with glaucomatous visual field (VF) loss, yet reading speed varies widely between patients and does not appear to be predicted by standard visual function measures. This within-person study aimed to investigate reading duration and eye movements when reading short passages of text in a patient’s worse eye (most VF damage) when compared to their better eye (least VF damage). Reading duration and saccade rate were significantly different on average in the worse eye when compared to the better eye () in 14 patients with glaucoma that had median (interquartile range) between-eye difference in mean deviation (MD; a standard clinical measure for VF loss) of 9.8 (8.3 to 14.8) dB; differences were not related to the size of the difference in MD between eyes. Patients with a more pronounced effect of longer reading duration on their worse eye made a larger proportion of “regressions” (backward saccades) and “unknown” EMs (not adhering to expected reading patterns) when reading with the worse eye when compared to the better eye. A between-eye study in patients with asymmetric disease, coupled with eye tracking, provides a useful experimental design for exploring reading performance in glaucoma.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: R Medicine > RE Ophthalmology
Divisions: School of Health Sciences > Department of Optometry & Visual Science
Related URLs:
URI: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/4992

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics