What if you went to the police and accused your uncle of abuse? Misunderstandings concerning the benefits of memory distortion: A commentary on Fernandez (2015)

Otgaar, H., Howe, M. L., Clarke, A., Wang, J. & Merckelbach, H. (2015). What if you went to the police and accused your uncle of abuse? Misunderstandings concerning the benefits of memory distortion: A commentary on Fernandez (2015). Consciousness and Cognition, 33, pp. 286-290. doi: 10.1016/j.concog.2015.01.015

[img]
Preview
Text - Accepted Version
Download (347kB) | Preview

Abstract

In a recent paper, Fernández (in press) argues that memory distortion can have beneficial outcomes. Although we agree with this, we find his reasoning and examples flawed to such degree that they will lead to misunderstandings rather than clarification in the field of memory (distortion). In his paper, Fernández uses the terms belief and memory incorrectly, creating a conceptual blur. Also, Fernández tries to make the case that under certain circumstances, false memories of abuse are beneficial. We argue against this idea as the reasoning behind this claim is based on controversial assumptions such as repression. Although it is true that memory distortions can be beneficial, the examples sketched by Fernández are not in line with recent documentation in this area.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: NOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Consciousness and Cognition. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Consciousness and Cognition.
Uncontrolled Keywords: False memory; Memory Distortion; Nonbelieved Memories; Adaptive Memory; Belief; Recollection
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: School of Social Sciences > Department of Psychology
URI: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/6400

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics