Tate Modern: pushing the limits of regeneration

Dean, C., Donnellan, C. & Pratt, A.C. (2010). Tate Modern: pushing the limits of regeneration. City, Culture and Society, 1(2), pp. 79-87. doi: 10.1016/j.ccs.2010.08.003

[img]
Preview
PDF - Accepted Version
Download (318kB) | Preview

Abstract

This paper questions the conventional limits of regeneration and highlights the limited range of approaches, especially in relation to cultural institutions and their multiplicity of audiences, and the fact that different policies evoke, or construct, various ‘publics’, ‘visitors’ and ‘audiences’. The question of who gains and looses is given an extra twist when the object or instrument of regeneration is a cultural institution: a gallery or museum. To this end we identify the manifest tensions between the instrumentalisation of museums and galleries, and the potential to undermine their core purpose. We draw upon a second literature of museology to provide contrasting notions of audience and inclusion since such analyses sensitize the debate regarding audience and regeneration and will illustrate these issues by reference to Tate Modern in London.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: NOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in City, Culture and Society. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in City, Culture and Society, Volume 1, Issue 2, June 2010, Pages 79–87, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ccs.2010.08.003.
Uncontrolled Keywords: Regeneration; Museums; London; Social inclusion; Culture
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HM Sociology
N Fine Arts > NX Arts in general
Divisions: School of Arts
URI: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/6623

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics