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The experiences of people who chew khat and the health care professionals who support them to stop

Begum, S. (2018). The experiences of people who chew khat and the health care professionals who support them to stop. (Unpublished Doctoral thesis, City, University of London)

Abstract

Background and aims: Very little is known about khat use in the UK. The aim of this study was to explore the barriers and enablers to quitting khat from the perspective of those using it and the barriers and enablers to supporting users to quit from the healthcare professional (HCP) perspective.

Methods: A qualitative study using semi structured interviews with users and HCPs in London. The Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF) was used to collect and analyse the data. The important domains were mapped onto the Behaviour Change Techniques Taxonomy (BCTT_v1) and two interventions targeting khat users and healthcare professionals were designed.

Results: A total of 10 khat users and 3 HCPs were interviewed. The beliefs held by khat users regarding the consequences of continued use facilitated their decision to quit. The social influences from those around them were a barrier and enabler. For healthcare professionals, the social influence of other colleagues and working together was key in enabling them to support clients. Social / professional role and identity was also an important enabler, as the healthcare professionals saw supporting users to quit as an integral part of their role. A range of BCTs were identified as potential ways in which quit attempts could be more successful, from the user and HCP perspective.

Conclusions: The study has highlighted key factors in enabling khat users to quit and HCPs to support them to do so. It has clear implications for current quit khat services and demonstrates how to target interventions by focusing on key barriers and enablers to quitting khat and supporting HCPs to deliver services. Recommendations for practice in the field of substance misuse and areas for future research have been identified.

Publication Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Subjects: R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine
Departments: Doctoral Theses
Doctoral Theses > School of Health Sciences Doctoral Theses
School of Health Sciences > Healthcare Services Research & Management
URI: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/20789
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