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MBRRACE in simulation: an evaluation of a multi-disciplinary simulation training for medical emergencies in obstetrics (MEmO)

Lavelle, M. ORCID: 0000-0002-3951-0011, Abthorpe, J., Simpson, T., Reedy, G., Little, F. and Banerjee, A. (2018). MBRRACE in simulation: an evaluation of a multi-disciplinary simulation training for medical emergencies in obstetrics (MEmO). Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 38(6), pp. 781-788. doi: 10.1080/01443615.2017.1419339

Abstract

he majority of maternal deaths in the UK are due to pre-existing or new-onset medical conditions, known as ‘indirect deaths’. The MBRRACE report identified serious gaps in clinicians’ human factors skills, including communication, leadership and teamwork, which contributed to maternal death. In response, we developed the first multi-disciplinary simulation-based training programme designed to address Medical Emergencies in Obstetrics (MEmO). Employing a mixed methods design, this study evaluated the educational impact of this training programme on the healthcare staff (n = 140), including the medical doctors (n = 91) and the midwives (n = 49). The training improved participants’ clinical management of medical deterioration in pregnancy (p=.003) alongside improving their human factors skills (p=.004). Furthermore, participants reported the translation of these skills to their routine clinical practice. This flexible training is responsive to the changing national needs and contextualises the MBRRACE findings for healthcare staff. It is a promising avenue for reducing the rates of in-direct death in pregnancy.

Impact statement

What is already known on this subject? The majority of maternal deaths in the UK are due to pre-existing or new-onset medical conditions. The management of medical conditions in pregnancy relies on a multi-professional approach. However, serious gaps in clinicians’ human factors skills, highlighted by the MBRRACE report, may contribute to maternal death.

What do the results of this study add? This study evaluated the first multi-disciplinary, simulation-based training programme designed to address Medical Emergencies in Obstetrics (MEmO). Training significantly improved participants’ management of medical deterioration in pregnancy and human factors skills, particularly in the areas of leadership, communication and teamwork. Moreover, the participants learning translated into their clinical practice.

What are the implications of these findings for clinical practice and/or further research? The delivery of multi-disciplinary team training for all healthcare staff involved in the complex management of medical conditions in pregnancy can help develop a greater understanding of others’ professional roles, and demonstrate the importance of interprofessional teamwork. Furthermore, it provides the space to reflect on team working approaches, including the leadership and professional autonomy, and their potential impact on patient care. Future research should evaluate the impact of this training on the objective outcome measures of medical emergencies in pregnancy.

Publication Type: Article
Publisher Keywords: 1114 Paediatrics and Reproductive Medicine
Subjects: R Medicine > RG Gynecology and obstetrics
Departments: School of Health Sciences > Healthcare Services Research & Management
URI: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/22427
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