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Seeding Change by Visioning Good Anthropocenes

Pereira, L. ORCID: 0000-0002-4996-7234, Bennett, E., Biggs, R., Mangnus, A., Norstrom, A. V., Peterson, G., Raudsepp-Hearne, C., Sellberg, M. and Vervoort, J. (2019). Seeding Change by Visioning Good Anthropocenes. Solutions Journal, 10(3),

Abstract

Although we are surrounded by dystopian stories about the age of the Anthropocene, the future does not have to be bleak. Seeds of alternative good futures occur in many places around the world and we can use these to help us think more creatively about pathways to more desirable futures in the Anthropocene. This paper describes the Seeds of Good Anthropocenes (SOGA) project that aims to identify where elements of Good Anthropocenes (‘seeds’) currently exist on the planet and how they can be used to help us envision pathways towards new, positive futures for the Earth and humanity. Each of the seeds is a potential solution that could help to shift us onto a more sustainable trajectory that will ensure both planetary and human wellbeing. The project has developed and combined novel visioning tools that engage a broad set of stakeholders in identifying potentially game-changing seed initiatives, and exploring how these could develop and combine to create radically alternative futures. This new scenario approach has been used in intergovernmental processes such as the UN Environment’s Global Environment Outlook (GEO) and the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES). By tapping into creativity and ingenuity, the SOGA scenario process provides a set of methodological tools through which we can think in new ways about how to navigate towards more desirable futures, starting with the pockets of these futures that are already with us in the present.

Publication Type: Article
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GN Anthropology
T Technology > TX Home economics
Departments: School of Arts & Social Sciences > Sociology
School of Arts & Social Sciences > Sociology > Food Policy
URI: https://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/22783
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