City Research Online

Sheet pile groups as an alternative foundation solution to cast in-situ concrete piles

Panchal, J. P., McNamara, A. M. ORCID: 0000-0002-3452-0800 and Goodey, R.J. ORCID: 0000-0002-9166-8393 (2020). Sheet pile groups as an alternative foundation solution to cast in-situ concrete piles. International Journal of Physical Modelling in Geotechnics, doi: 10.1680/jphmg.18.00053

Abstract

Concrete piles have become a common high load bearing foundation solutions providing end bearing and frictional resistance along the shaft. They are typically used for founding commercial or residential blocks with a design life of approximately 50 years. Following this the superstructure is decommissioned and may be demolished. However, piles are difficult to remove and therefore future developers can incur significant expense and programme delays in preparing the site to avoid obstructions. If removed, concrete piles are required to be broken down which is a slow and laborious process. However, a foundation solution has been developed that allows foundations to be installed and extracted with relative ease whilst still achieving a similar, if not improved capacity. This solution has been defined as a hybrid foundation comprising deep sheet piles for shaft resistance and a pile cap as a shallow foundation. The hybrid pile offers significant advantages over concrete piles include ease of installation, extraction, reuse and economy. Axial capacity of individual sheet piles is low, however geometrically arranging sheet piles; was shown to offer comparable or improved capacity over conventional concrete piles. The results from a series of centrifuge tests are presented in this paper.

Publication Type: Article
Publisher Keywords: Bearing capacity; Centrifuge modelling; Piles & piling; Sheet piles & cofferdams; Urban regeneration
Subjects: T Technology > TA Engineering (General). Civil engineering (General)
Departments: School of Mathematics, Computer Science & Engineering > Engineering > Civil Engineering
URI: https://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/23684
[img] Text - Accepted Version
This document is not freely accessible until 21 January 2021 due to copyright restrictions.

To request a copy, please use the button below.

Request a copy

Export

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics

Actions (login required)

Admin Login Admin Login