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Implementation of a knowledge mobilization model to prevent peripheral venous catheter-related adverse events: PREBACP study-a multicenter cluster-randomized trial protocol.

Blanco-Mavillard, I., Bennasar-Veny, M., De Pedro-Gómez, J. E., Moya-Suarez, A. B., Parra-Garcia, G., Rodríguez-Calero, M. A., Castro-Sanchez, E. ORCID: 0000-0002-3351-9496, Molero-Ballester, L., Fernández-Fernández, I., Prieto-Alomar, A., Ferrer-Cruz, F., Cardona-Rosello, J., Zaforas-Sánchez, S., Mut-Salvà, G. and Gómez-Queipo, V. (2018). Implementation of a knowledge mobilization model to prevent peripheral venous catheter-related adverse events: PREBACP study-a multicenter cluster-randomized trial protocol.. Implementation Science, 13(1), 100.. doi: 10.1186/s13012-018-0792-z

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Peripheral venous catheters are the most commonly used invasive devices in hospitals worldwide. Patients can experience multiple adverse events during the insertion, maintenance, and management of these devices. Health professionals aim to resolve the challenges of care variability in the use of peripheral venous catheter through adherence to clinical practice guidelines. The aim of this cluster-randomized controlled trial is to determine the efficacy of a multimodal intervention on incidence of adverse events associated with the use of peripheral venous catheters in adult hospital patients. Additional aims are to analyze the fidelity of nurses and the relationship between contextual factors on the use of best available and the outcomes of the intervention.

METHODS: Five public hospitals in the Spanish National Health System, with diverse profiles, including one university hospital and four second-level hospitals, will be included. In total, 20 hospitalization wards will be randomized for this study by ward to one of two groups. Those in the first group receive an intervention that lasts 12 months implementing evidence-based practice in healthcare related to peripheral catheters through a multimodal strategy, which will contain updated and poster protocols insertion, maintenance and removal of peripheral venous catheters, technologies applied to e-learning, feedback on the results, user and family information related to peripheral catheter, and facilitation of the best evidence by face-to-face training session.

PRIMARY OUTCOME MEASURES: Incidence of adverse events associated with the use of peripheral venous catheters is measured by assessing hospital records.

SECONDARY OUTCOME MEASURES: Nurses' adherence to clinical practice guidelines, clinical outcomes, and the cost of implementing the multimodal intervention.

DISCUSSION: Clinical implementation is a complex, multifaceted phenomenon which requires a deep understanding of decision-making, knowledge mobilization, and sense making in routine clinical practice. Likewise, the inclusion of strategies that promote fidelity to recommendations through multicomponent and multimodal intervention must be encouraged. The use of a transfer model could counterbalance one of the greatest challenges for organizations, the evaluation of the impact of the implementation of evidence in the professional context through quality indicators associated with prevention and control of infections.

TRIAL REGISTRATION: Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN10438530 . Registered 20 March 2018.

Publication Type: Article
Additional Information: This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.
Publisher Keywords: Knowledge mobilization; Evidence-based practice; Clinical practice guideline; Catheter- related adverse events; Peripheral venous catheterization
Subjects: R Medicine
Departments: School of Health Sciences > Nursing
Date Deposited: 18 Jun 2020 15:32
URI: https://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/24315
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