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Recovery in Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD): A Qualitative Study of Service Users' Perspectives

Katsakou, C., Marougka, S., Barnicot, K. ORCID: 0000-0001-5083-5135, Savill, M., White, H., Lockwood, K. and Priebe, S. (2012). Recovery in Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD): A Qualitative Study of Service Users' Perspectives. PLOS ONE, 7(5), e36517. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0036517

Abstract

Background: Symptom improvement in Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) is more common than previously hypothesised. However, it remains unclear whether it reflects service users' personal goals of recovery. The present study aimed to explore what service users with BPD view as recovery.

Methods: 48 service users were recruited from secondary mental health services and their views on their personal goals and the meaning of recovery were explored in in-depth semi-structured interviews. The study drew on grounded theory and thematic analysis.

Results: Service users believed that recovery involved developing self-acceptance and self-confidence, gaining control over emotions, improving relationships, employment, and making progress in symptoms like suicidality and self-harming. They felt that psychotherapies for BPD often had an extreme focus on specific areas, like self-harming or relationships, and that some of their goals were neglected. Although full recovery was seen as a distant goal, interviewees felt that they could learn how to deal with their problems in more effective ways and make meaningful progress in their lives.

Conclusions: Specialist therapies for BPD explicitly address some of the recovery goals that are important to service users, whereas other goals are only indirectly or poorly addressed. Professionals might need to work with service users towards devising comprehensive individualised case formulations, including all treatment targets that are important to service users, their priorities, and long-term plans on how their targets might be met and which services might be involved.

Publication Type: Article
Additional Information: © 2012 Katsakou et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
R Medicine > RM Therapeutics. Pharmacology
Departments: School of Health Sciences > Nursing
Related URLs:
Date Deposited: 28 Jul 2020 10:20
URI: https://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/24560
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