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Subjective well-being and economic and political conditions in Latin America

Macchia, L. (2020). Subjective well-being and economic and political conditions in Latin America. (Unpublished Doctoral thesis, City, University of London)

Abstract

This thesis investigates whether macroeconomic and political conditions, governments’ and individuals’ political orientation and citizens’ confidence in national institutions are associated with citizens’ subjective well-being in Latin America. The work presented in this thesis aims to contribute to the large body of research that examines subjective well-being as a measure of social well-being and progress. This thesis focuses on Latin America, a region with a turbulent economic and political past that has rarely been the centre of subjective well-being studies. Specifically, I explore the association between economic and political indicators in a period of profound economic reforms in the region (1996-2016). The study included in chapter 2 demonstrates that trends and fluctuations of economic indicators are associated with trends and fluctuations of subjective well-being. Chapter 3 shows that governments’ and individuals’ political orientation are associated with citizens’ subjective well-being and that subjective well-being varies over the electoral cycle. Chapter 4 provides evidence that citizens’ confidence in national institutions is positively associated with citizens’ subjective well-being. Finally, chapter 5 demonstrates that income inequality, one of the most relevant socio-economic problems of the region, moderates the association between income rank (a measure that involves comparisons of income) and subjective well-being. The studies included in this thesis reveal how economic and political conditions are associated with one of the ultimate goals of every society, citizens’ wellbeing, in a region with a turbulent economic and political past like Latin America.

Publication Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Departments: Doctoral Theses
Doctoral Theses > School of Arts and Social Sciences Doctoral Theses
School of Arts & Social Sciences > Psychology
Date Deposited: 12 Nov 2020 16:07
URI: https://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/25242
[img] Text - Accepted Version
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