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Qualitative exploration of health professionals' experiences of communicating positive newborn bloodspot screening results for nine conditions in England

Chudleigh, J. H. ORCID: 0000-0002-7334-8708, Chinnery, H., Bonham, J. R., Olander, E. K. ORCID: 0000-0001-7792-9895, Moody, L., Simpson, A. ORCID: 0000-0003-3286-9846, Morris, S., Ulph, F., Bryon, M. and Southern, K. (2020). Qualitative exploration of health professionals' experiences of communicating positive newborn bloodspot screening results for nine conditions in England. BMJ Open, 10(e03708), doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2020-037081

Abstract

Objective
To explore health professionals’ experiences of communicating positive newborn bloodspot screening (NBS) results, highlight differences, share good practice and make recommendations for future research.

Design
Qualitative exploratory design was employed using semi-structured interviews

Setting
Three National Health Service provider organisations in England

Participants
Seventeen health professionals involved in communicating positive newborn bloodspot screening results to parents for all nine conditions currently included in the newborn bloodspot screening programme in England.

Results
Findings indicated variation in approaches to communicating positive newborn bloodspot screening results to parents, largely influenced by resources available and the lack of clear guidance. Health professionals emphasised the importance of communicating results to families in a way that is sensitive to their needs. However, many challenges hindered communication including logistical considerations; difficulty contacting the family and other health professionals; language barriers; parental reactions; resource considerations; lack of training; and insufficient time.

Conclusion
Health professionals invest a lot of time and energy trying to ensure communication of positive newborn bloodspot screening results to families is done well. However, there continues to be great variation in the way these results are communicated to parents and this is largely influenced by resources available but also the lack of concrete guidance. How best to support health professionals undertaking this challenging and emotive task requires further exploration. We recommend evaluation of a more cohesive approach that meets the needs of parents and staff while being sensitive to the subtleties of each condition.

Publication Type: Article
Subjects: R Medicine > RG Gynecology and obstetrics
R Medicine > RT Nursing
Departments: School of Health Sciences > Midwifery & Radiography
School of Health Sciences > Nursing
Date Deposited: 14 Jan 2021 12:44
URI: https://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/25515
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