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Identifying barriers and facilitators to recognition and response to patient clinical deterioration by clinicians using a behaviour change approach: A qualitative study

Walker, R. M., Boorman, R. J., Vaux, A., Cooke, M., Aitken, L. M. ORCID: 0000-0001-5722-9090 and Marshall, A. P. (2021). Identifying barriers and facilitators to recognition and response to patient clinical deterioration by clinicians using a behaviour change approach: A qualitative study. Journal of Clinical Nursing, doi: 10.1111/jocn.15620

Abstract

Background: Failure of clinicians to recognise and respond to patient clinical deterioration is associated with increased hospital mortality. Emergency response teams are implemented throughout hospitals to support direct-care clinicians in managing patient deterioration, but patient clinical deterioration is often not identified or acted upon by clinicians in ward settings. To date, no studies have used an integrative theoretical framework in multiple sites to examine why clinicians’ delay identification and action on patients’ clinical deterioration.

Aim: To identify barriers and facilitators that influence clinicians’ absent or delayed response to patient clinical deterioration using the Theoretical Domains Framework.

Methods: The Theoretical Domains Framework guided: (a) semi-structured interviews with clinicians, health consumers and family members undertaken at two sites; (b) deductive analyses of inductive themes to identify barriers and facilitators to optimal care. This study complied with the COREQ research guidelines.

Findings: Seven themes identified: (a) information transfer; (b) ownership of patient care; (c) confidence to respond; (d) knowledge and skills; (e) culture; (f) emotion; and (g) environmental context and resources.

Discussion: The Theoretical Domains Framework identified traditional social and professional hierarchies and limitations due to environmental contexts and resources as contributors to diminished interprofessional recognition and impediments to the development of effective relationships between professional groups. Communication processes were impacted by these restraints and further confounded by inadequate policy development and limited access to regular effective team-based training. As a result, patient safety was compromised, and clinicians frustrated.

Conclusions: These results inform the development, implementation and evaluation of a behaviour change intervention and increase knowledge about barriers and facilitators to timely response to patient clinical deterioration.

Relevance to clinical practice: Results contribute to understanding of why clinicians delay responding to patient clinical deterioration and suggest key recommendations to identify and challenge traditional hierarchies and practices that prevent interdisciplinary collaboration and decision-making.

Publication Type: Article
Additional Information: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Walker, R.M., Boorman, R.J., Vaux, A., Cooke, M., Aitken, L.M. and Marshall, A.P. (2021), Identifying barriers and facilitators to recognition and response to patient clinical deterioration by clinicians using a behaviour change approach: A qualitative study. J Clin Nurs., which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1111/jocn.15620. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions."
Publisher Keywords: patient safety, policy, clinical decision-making, organisational behaviour, qualitative study
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine
R Medicine > RT Nursing
Departments: School of Health Sciences
Date Deposited: 10 Mar 2021 13:35
URI: https://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/25775
[img] Text - Accepted Version
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