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Evaluating the efficacy of a self-help compassionate journal keeping intervention in addressing experiences of shame, low self-compassion, fear of self-compassion and disorder symptoms in individuals with an eating disorder

Koc, C. (2020). Evaluating the efficacy of a self-help compassionate journal keeping intervention in addressing experiences of shame, low self-compassion, fear of self-compassion and disorder symptoms in individuals with an eating disorder. (Unpublished Doctoral thesis, City, University of London)

Abstract

The current study examined whether self-compassion journal keeping as a self-help intervention for 2-weeks is able to address experiences of shame, low self-compassion, fear of compassion and disorder symptoms in individuals with an eating disorder. 41 participants recruited from an eating disorders service were randomly allocated to two conditions; experimental and control condition. Participants in the experimental condition recorded a self-compassion diary over 2weeks using self-help material and recorded a log of the amount of time they spent writing in their journals. Participants in the control condition remained on the waiting list. All participants completed 6 measures at the start of the experiments and repeated these at the end of the 2weeks. The findings showed that shame and low-compassion experienced as a personality trait at the core of one’s self identity and the characteristics and the severity of one’s eating psychopathology cannot be addressed within a 2 week period using a self-help intervention designed to cultivate self-compassion. Momentary experiences of low compassion and shame and fear of compassion on the other hand can be addressed within this time period using this intervention. Specifically, the findings suggested that CFT informed interventions may have a degree of therapeutic significance for individuals with an eating disorder. The findings also suggested that low intensity interventions such as self-help may be appropriate for this clinical group and can be considered as an alternative to no treatment waiting lists.

Publication Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Departments: Doctoral Theses
Doctoral Theses > School of Arts and Social Sciences Doctoral Theses
School of Arts & Social Sciences > Psychology
Date Deposited: 20 Apr 2021 16:06
URI: https://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/25947
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