City Research Online

Evaluation of training, patient and practitioner perspectives on community‐based monitoring of patients with stable age‐related macular degeneration compared to hospital‐based care: The FENETRE study report no. 1

Read, S., Lawrenson, J. ORCID: 0000-0002-2031-6390, Harper, R. A., Hanley, T., Balaskas, K. and Waterman, H. (2021). Evaluation of training, patient and practitioner perspectives on community‐based monitoring of patients with stable age‐related macular degeneration compared to hospital‐based care: The FENETRE study report no. 1. Ophthalmic and Physiological Optics, 41(4), pp. 864-873. doi: 10.1111/opo.12836

Abstract

Purpose
Describe the development, delivery, acceptability and evaluation of a modular training programme for community-based, non-medical practitioners monitoring patients with quiescent neovascular age related macular degeneration (QnAMD). Also, report on a qualitative process evaluation conducted during the pilot phase of a randomised control trial (the FENETRE Study) exploring patient and practitioner acceptability of community-based QnAMD care relative to hospital-based care.

Methods
Learning outcomes from The College of Optometrists’ Medical Retina higher qualifications and the Royal College of Ophthalmologists’ Common Clinical Competency Framework were used to develop a competency framework for QnAMD care. Training was delivered online, comprising six asynchronous lectures followed by two synchronous case-based discussion webinars, with an accredited assessment of 24 case vignettes. An anonymous evaluation survey was conducted with the first two FENETRE cohorts (n = 38). Separately, we undertook a qualitative process evaluation, sampling purposively in four hospitals and five community-based practices, interviewing nine patients and eight practitioners.

Results
Survey responses (n = 26) showed community optometrists were very satisfied (n = 12; 46%) or satisfied (n = 14; 54%) with the training; feedback reflected by qualitative process evaluation data. Overall, optometrists also felt either confident (n = 15; 58%) or very confident (n = 8; 31%) in conducting AMD monitoring appointments following training, a finding also corroborated by interview data from optometrists participating in the initial pilot phase roll-out. Optometrists identified patient convenience and alleviating pressures in hospital care as the primary reasons for acceptability of community pathways. Data from patients entering community practices suggested they largely found this at least as safe and convenient as hospital care, although some patients randomised to hospital care perceived that as safer.

Conclusion
This pilot study has shown the development and implementation of a collaborative community monitoring model is feasible, with satisfaction from community optometrists for training and accreditation, and broad acceptance for the pathway by both patients and practitioners.

Publication Type: Article
Additional Information: © 2021 The Authors Ophthalmic and Physiological Optics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of College of Optometrists This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Publisher Keywords: accreditation, clinical competence, optometry, primary health care, secondary care, wet macular degeneration
Subjects: R Medicine > RE Ophthalmology
Departments: School of Health Sciences > Optometry & Visual Science
Date available in CRO: 08 Jun 2021 10:31
Date deposited: 8 June 2021
Date of acceptance: 1 April 2021
Date of first online publication: 25 May 2021
URI: https://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/26249
[img]
Preview
Text - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (158kB) | Preview

Export

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics

Actions (login required)

Admin Login Admin Login