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Intermediaries and cross-examination resilience in children: The development of a novel experimental methodology

Henry, L. ORCID: 0000-0001-5422-4358, Crane, L., Millmore, A., Nash, G. and Wilcock, R. (2021). Intermediaries and cross-examination resilience in children: The development of a novel experimental methodology. Applied Cognitive Psychology, doi: 10.1002/acp.3869

Abstract

Experimental studies examining child ‘witnesses’ under cross-examination typically rely on researchers questioning children using a ‘barrister’s script’. In the current research, experienced barristers used a defence statement from a mock perpetrator (who committed a theft 11 months earlier) to challenge typically developing children’s evidence under cross-examination. We also assessed whether Registered Intermediaries (RIs), trained professionals who facilitate communication between vulnerable witnesses and members of the justice system, help children reduce compliance with misleading cross-examination suggestions. Results demonstrated that children (6-11 years) complied with barristers’ challenges to a high degree: 94% agreed with at least one of the barristers’ seven false suggestions. However, when assisted by an RI, children were significantly less compliant with barrister challenges. These findings, and additional analyses of the nature of child responses and barrister questions, provide novel exploratory evidence for the beneficial role of RIs in tempering the adverse effects of cross-examination style questioning for children.

Publication Type: Article
Additional Information: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Henry, L. , Crane, L., Millmore, A., Nash, G. and Wilcock, R. (2021). Intermediaries and cross-examination resilience in children: The development of a novel experimental methodology. Applied Cognitive Psychology, published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1002/acp.3869. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions. This article may not be enhanced, enriched or otherwise transformed into a derivative work, without express permission from Wiley or by statutory rights under applicable legislation. Copyright notices must not be removed, obscured or modified. The article must be linked to Wiley’s version of record on Wiley Online Library and any embedding, framing or otherwise making available the article or pages thereof by third parties from platforms, services and websites other than Wiley Online Library must be prohibited.
Publisher Keywords: cross-examination, barristers, child witnesses, Registered Intermediaries, court
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
K Law
Departments: School of Health Sciences > Language & Communication Science
Date available in CRO: 24 Aug 2021 13:01
Date deposited: 24 August 2021
Date of acceptance: 17 August 2021
Date of first online publication: 27 August 2021
URI: https://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/26652
[img] Text - Accepted Version
This document is not freely accessible until 27 August 2022 due to copyright restrictions.
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives.

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