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Responding to the China Challenge in Techno‐nationalism: Divergence between Germany and the United States

Starrs, S. ORCID: 0000-0002-0333-8950 and Germann, J. (2021). Responding to the China Challenge in Techno‐nationalism: Divergence between Germany and the United States. Development and Change, 52(5), doi: 10.1111/dech.12683

Abstract

President Xi Jinping has made clear that the ‘Great Rejuvenation of the Chinese Nation’ will involve world-leading competitiveness: his ‘Made in China 2025’ plan identifies 10 core sectors of advanced technology. This article investigates how elites in the United States and Germany have responded to this ‘China challenge’, a burgeoning ‘techno-nationalist’ phase of globalization. First, the article explores the divergent state responses of the USA and Germany: while both national elites are concerned, the reaction of the US has been far more confrontational. It then tries to explain this striking contrast in terms of the disparate domestic constituents. The US since Trump has aligned electoral grievances around manufacturing job losses with the interests of the national security establishment. In contrast, German labour has fared better in globalization, and the German state has not been able to override the interests of German capital in the way that the US has. Thus, the authors offer an account of how Germany and the US have responded differently to the China challenge, as well as explaining why with reference to the divergent structural conditions and class interests. The article ends by speculating that ‘techno-nationalism’ will only accelerate in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Publication Type: Article
Additional Information: © 2021 International Institute of Social Studies. This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Starrs, S. and Germann, J. (2021). Responding to the China Challenge in Techno‐nationalism: Divergence between Germany and the United States. Development and Change, 52(5), which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1111/dech.12683. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions. This article may not be enhanced, enriched or otherwise transformed into a derivative work, without express permission from Wiley or by statutory rights under applicable legislation. Copyright notices must not be removed, obscured or modified. The article must be linked to Wiley’s version of record on Wiley Online Library and any embedding, framing or otherwise making available the article or pages thereof by third parties from platforms, services and websites other than Wiley Online Library must be prohibited.
Publisher Keywords: Made in China 2025; Techno-Nationalism; Globalization; Germany; United States; Industrial Policy; Geo-Economics
Subjects: J Political Science > JF Political institutions (General)
J Political Science > JZ International relations
Departments: School of Arts & Social Sciences > International Politics
Date available in CRO: 12 Oct 2021 10:17
Date deposited: 12 October 2021
Date of acceptance: 17 July 2021
Date of first online publication: 3 October 2021
URI: https://openaccess.city.ac.uk/id/eprint/26878
[img] Text - Accepted Version
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