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Prevalence of common mental disorders and treatment receipt for people from ethnic minority backgrounds in England: Repeated cross-sectional surveys of the general population in 2007 and 2014

Ahmad, G., McManus, S. ORCID: 0000-0003-2711-0819, Cooper, C. , Hatch, S. L. & Das-Munshi, J. (2021). Prevalence of common mental disorders and treatment receipt for people from ethnic minority backgrounds in England: Repeated cross-sectional surveys of the general population in 2007 and 2014. British Journal of Psychiatry, doi: 10.1192/bjp.2021.179

Abstract

Background
Concerns persist that some ethnic minority groups experience longstanding mental health inequalities in England. It is unclear if these have changed over time.
Aims
To assess the prevalence of common mental disorders (CMDs) and treatment receipt by ethnicity, and changes over time, using data from the nationally representative probability sample in the Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Surveys.

Method
We used survey data from 2007 (n = 7187) and 2014 (n = 7413). A Clinical Interview Schedule - Revised score of ≥12 indicated presence of a CMD. Treatment receipt included current antidepressant use; any counselling or therapy; seeing a general practitioner about mental health; or seeing a community psychiatrist, psychologist or psychiatric nurse, in the past 12 months. Multivariable logistic regression assessed CMD prevalence and treatment receipt by ethnicity.

Results
CMD prevalence was highest in the Black group; ethnic variation was explained by demographic and socioeconomic factors. After adjustment for these factors and CMDs, odds ratios for treatment receipt were lower for the Asian (0.62, 95% CI 0.39-1.00) and White Other (0.58, 95% CI 0.38-0.87) groups in 2014, compared with the White British group; for the Black group, this inequality appeared to be widening over time (2007 treatment receipt odds ratio 0.68, 95% CI 0.38-1.23; 2014 treatment receipt odds ratio 0.23, 95% CI 0.13-0.40; survey year interaction P < 0.0001).

Conclusions
Treatment receipt was lower for all ethnic minority groups compared with the White British group, and lowest among Black people, for whom inequalities appear to be widening over time. Addressing socioeconomic inequality could reduce ethnic inequalities in mental health problems, but this does not explain pronounced treatment inequalities.

Publication Type: Article
Additional Information: Copyright © The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of the Royal College of Psychiatrists. This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Publisher Keywords: Ethnicity, mental health inequalities, treatment inequalities, common mental disorders, social epidemiology
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HT Communities. Classes. Races
R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine
Departments: School of Health Sciences
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