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The evaluation of a brief online Cognitive Behavioural Therapy informed group for Maladaptive Eating Patterns in a preoperative bariatric surgery sample: A mixed-methods study

Enache, G (2021). The evaluation of a brief online Cognitive Behavioural Therapy informed group for Maladaptive Eating Patterns in a preoperative bariatric surgery sample: A mixed-methods study. (Unpublished Doctoral thesis, City, University of London)

Abstract

Maladaptive eating patterns (MEPs) are a treatment-limiting factor for most individuals seeking bariatric surgery due to prior research linking them to poorer surgery outcomes (NICE, 2014). To date, there is only a small, heterogeneous body of literature in preoperative psychological interventions targeting MEPs that has rendered mixed findings, leading some researchers to conclude that the best timing for such interventions is post-surgery. Nonetheless, given the documented higher prevalence of MEPs in the pre-bariatric population, individuals may require additional psychological support to qualify for surgery, particularly in the UK. Therefore, there is a need for developing evidence-based interventions targeting MEPs for this under-researched population.

A mixed-methods study was conducted, aiming at evaluating an online four-week CBT-informed group intervention for MEPs. Forty-four pre-bariatric candidates presenting with MEPs attended the group intervention. Data on MEPs and Wellbeing (mood, anxiety, quality of life) was collected at: psychological assessment, pre- and post-group intervention timepoints. Semi-structured interviews were conducted alongside feedback questionnaires at post-intervention timepoint.

Results indicated significant improvements in participants’ levels of BE and UE at post-intervention timepoint only (p<.01), with significant differences being found across all timepoints for EE (p<.01). No differences were observed in Cognitive Restraint (p=.37). Furthermore, significant improvements in Wellbeing were observed at post-intervention timepoint only (p< .01). Participants reported that the intervention was helpful and informative, highlighting various useful behaviour change mechanisms. They suggested a more balanced/flexible coverage of MEPs and an increase in the number of sessions to allow for more interaction time and consolidation of skills. Overall findings suggest the intervention was successful in improving participants’ MEPs and Wellbeing.

Publication Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Departments: Doctoral Theses
School of Arts & Social Sciences
School of Arts & Social Sciences > Psychology
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