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"Stuck between a Rock and a Hard Place": How Mental Health Nurses' Experience Psychosocial interventions in Irish Mental Health Care Settings.

Smyth, S., De Vries, J., Rossetti, J. & McCann, E. ORCID: 0000-0003-3548-4204 (2021). "Stuck between a Rock and a Hard Place": How Mental Health Nurses' Experience Psychosocial interventions in Irish Mental Health Care Settings.. Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, 28(4), pp. 590-600. doi: 10.1111/jpm.12702

Abstract

What is known on the subject?
Psychosocial interventions (PSI) are recognized and recommended internationally as they primarily focus on improving a client's mental health and preventing relapse.
Limited qualitative studies focus on the similarities and differences on offering PSI in practice across many countries.

What this paper adds to existing knowledge?
This manuscript provides readers with qualitative findings of mental health nurses’ (MHNs) experiences of using PSI in practice and the need for regular clinical supervision to increase MHNs confidence and enhance the offering of PSI.
MHNs want PSI guidelines for the offering of these skills to their client groups across practice settings.
MHNs require work release from practice to attend supplementary training on PSI so that they can do their job adequately.

What are the implications for practice?
This study sheds light on the similarities and differences on PSI in Irish mental health services. It also highlights what MHNs recognize as important for PSI to be implemented. Clinical supervision and the development of PSI guidelines are necessary so that MHNs feel confident delivering these skills. They also need ongoing work release from practice to attend supplementary PSI training to provide best evidence to enhancing client experiences and positive PSI recovery outcomes.

Abstract
4.1 Description
The paper will report on the interview data of trained MHNs’ experiences of using PSI within the Irish context. This observational data will be reported elsewhere (Smyth et al. 2020—under review).

4.2 Introduction
This research is conducted when the current reform of Irish mental health governance demands clarification of key psychosocial skills (PSI) required for mental health nurses (MHNs) to embrace recovery-orientated ways of working. There is limited evidence about this important topic in Ireland and across countries.

4.3 Aim
To explore PSI-trained MHNs’ experiences of using PSI within Ireland.

4.4 Method
A multiple case study methodology was used and situated within an interpretive paradigm. Data were gathered using semi-structured interviews with 40 PSI-trained MHNs.

4.5 Findings
Three overarching themes developed from the analysis. These included (a) PSI-trained MHNs’ understanding and use of PSI; (b) facilitating factors supporting the use of PSI by PSI-trained MHNs; and (c) obstacles limiting the use of PSI by PSI-trained MHNs.

4.6 Discussion
MHNs recognize that regular clinical supervision is required to increase their confidence, along with PSI guidelines for the offering of these skills across practice settings. MHNs also need work release to attend supplementary training on PSI so that they can do their job adequately.

4.7 Implications for practice
This study suggests that MHNs are often stuck between a rock and a hard place when delivering PSI in practice. MHNs need to be aware that this can affect client outcomes.

4.8 Relevance statement
This research identified a gap in knowledge within the Irish context but also across the world on this important topic. MHNs need access to regular clinical supervision, PSI guidelines and ongoing PSI training to feel confident in order to keep abreast of the changes happening in mental health practice and research.

Publication Type: Article
Additional Information: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Smyth, S, De Vries, JMA, Rossetti, J, McCann, E. “Stuck between a Rock and a Hard Place”: How Mental Health Nurses’ Experience Psychosocial interventions in Irish Mental Health Care Settings. J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs. 2021; 28: 590– 600., which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1111/jpm.12702. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions. This article may not be enhanced, enriched or otherwise transformed into a derivative work, without express permission from Wiley or by statutory rights under applicable legislation. Copyright notices must not be removed, obscured or modified. The article must be linked to Wiley’s version of record on Wiley Online Library and any embedding, framing or otherwise making available the article or pages thereof by third parties from platforms, services and websites other than Wiley Online Library must be prohibited.
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC0321 Neuroscience. Biological psychiatry. Neuropsychiatry
R Medicine > RT Nursing
Departments: School of Health Sciences > Nursing
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