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Eliciting preferences for redistribution across domains: A study on wealth, education, and health

Macchia, L. ORCID: 0000-0001-9558-4747 & Ariely, D. (2021). Eliciting preferences for redistribution across domains: A study on wealth, education, and health. Analyses of Social Issues and Public Policy, 21(1), pp. 1141-1166. doi: 10.1111/asap.12279

Abstract

People's preferences for redistribution are a key component of redistributive policy design, yet how to elicit these preferences is still a matter of debate. We recruited a nationally representative sample of more than 5000 US respondents. We used an approach based on principles of justice to elicit people's preferences for redistribution across different domains. We compared people's preferences for the distribution of wealth, good educational resources, and good health status. We found that people have different preferences across domains: they accept higher inequality in wealth whereas they prefer more equal distributions in education and health. These preferences are consistent across different demographic groups. We discuss policymaking implications: when designing redistributive policies, policymakers should take this approach into account to trigger more favorable reactions to such policies.

Publication Type: Article
Additional Information: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Macchia, L. & Ariely, D. Eliciting preferences for redistribution across domains: A study on wealth, education, and health. Analyses of Social Issues and Public Policy. 2021; 21: 1141– 1166 https://doi.org/10.1111/asap.12279, which has been published in final form at This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions. This article may not be enhanced, enriched or otherwise transformed into a derivative work, without express permission from Wiley or by statutory rights under applicable legislation. Copyright notices must not be removed, obscured or modified. The article must be linked to Wiley’s version of record on Wiley Online Library and any embedding, framing or otherwise making available the article or pages thereof by third parties from platforms, services and websites other than Wiley Online Library must be prohibited.
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
H Social Sciences > HN Social history and conditions. Social problems. Social reform
R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine
Departments: School of Arts & Social Sciences > Psychology
[img] Text - Accepted Version
This document is not freely accessible until 28 October 2022 due to copyright restrictions.

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